How To: Aqua Borne Ceramic for Medical & Dental Facilities

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How To: Aqua Borne Ceramic for Medical & Dental Facilities

            Aqua Borne Ceramic finishes are ideally suited to protect and beautify medical and dental facilities. Hospitals, clinics nursing homes, Doctor’s offices, Dentist’s offices, animal hospitals and all medical facilities can benefit from the use of Aqua Borne Ceramic finishes. These 100% acrylic water borne coatings can be used in tough applications where it was previously necessary to use an alkyd solvent-base coating. Aqua Borne Ceramic coatings adhere tenaciously to old alkyd and oil finishes. They dry to a hard, smooth impervious finish. Burnish resistance is greatly enhanced.

Aqua Borne Ceramic finishes contain ceramic microsphere’s which resist dirt and stains and promotes easy washing. Dirt and stains wash right off! The tough 100% acrylic resins hold up when heavy-duty cleaners such as 409, Fantastik, Challenger, quat and phenol-type cleaners are used. The hard, smooth film makes it difficult for mold and mildew to get started.

The products have extremely low odor. Dry times are very fast. Painting can be accomplished with a minimum of disruption. These products achieve most of their resistance properties overnight. Dirt and stains can be washed off the next day after application without fear of damaging the paint film. Products can be tinted to make almost 1500 colors.

Painters love the easy application. They like the way the product touches-up and the way the product does not picture-frame.  We have the Aqua Borne Ceramic available in all different finishes.

 

How To: Refinish Paneling

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How To: Refinish Paneling

Old paneling can become dingy over time and a fresh coat of paint can really rejuvenate the room. With a little effort in preparing the job and the use of California Aqua Borne Ceramic Finishes, your room can become bright and cheery.

  • Cover up and mask any areas that might be damaged by cleaning and painting.
  • Clean the paneling thoroughly with a good household cleaner such as Fantastik, or 409. Rinse off cleaner with water. It is very important to remove all traces of oil, dirt and grease. Paint will not stick to oily surfaces. Paneling typically build up oils and grease over the years, particularly next to food preparation areas so it is really important to make sure all oil and grease are removed. It may be necessary to use a product made specifically to remove grease.
  • If the old finish is glossy, it must be sanded to remove the gloss. Use sandpaper, not steel wool. Steel wool will leave small steel fibers that may rust from the water in the finish causing brown rust spots. It usually a good idea to sand to make the surface smooth and dull. After sanding remove the sanding dust with a rag moistened with water or use a vacuum. So not use tack rags as they may cause poor adhesion of the finish coat.
  • It is not absolutely essential to use a primer since in most cases the California Aqua Borne Ceramic Finishes will adhere well to the paneling without a primer. However it may be desirable to use 320-00 Aqua Borne Acrylic Primer/Undercoater to fill in small cracks and surface imperfections and reduce the number of finish coats particularly if the paneling is dark. This primer can be sanded to achieve a very smooth surface. Either with or without a primer, it is suggested that a small area be coated first and the adhesion checked after the trial area is thoroughly dry before coating the entire job.
  • Apply a coat of California Aqua Borne Ceramic Satin or Gloss finish with a brush, roller or spray equipment. Do not reduce the finish for brush or roller application. Two coats will give maximum protection. Reduce with water as needed for spray applications. Allow to dry overnight..
  • Clean up equipment with soap and water.
  • Step back and admire your work!
  • *Note: Some very old paneling may have been coated with shellac. California Aqua borne ceramic finishes will partially dissolve shellac-causing cracking of the film. If paneling to be refinished is coated with shellac, first prime the cabinets with Acryplex #4 Oil Stain Sealer. You can test to see if the cabinets have been shellacked by rubbing the cabinet with alcohol. Alcohol will dissolve shellac.

How To: Painting Formica

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Painting Formica

Old dingy formica can be rejuvenated and given a modern color by painting the formica with California Aqua Borne Ceramic products. California Aqua Borne Ceramic products have excellent adhesion to formica surfaces as long as they are clean.

The first step is to thoroughly clean the surface to remove dirt, grease, oil, soap scum, water hardness deposits and any other foreign materials that might interfere with adhesion. Wash the surfaces with a strong detergent solution or other good household cleaner. Rinse. Inspect to make sure all foreign matter has been removed.

Scuff-sand the surface of the formica to dull the gloss and give the paint a rough surface to bite into. Remove the sanding dust with a damp rag.

Apply a coat of 320-00 Aqua Borne Blockout/Undercoater White. If necessary, the 320-00 undercoater may be sanded to achieve a very smooth finish. Let dry for four hours and apply a coat of the new California Ultra Gloss, Satin, or Flat finish. Apply a second coat if necessary.

The products can be applied by brush, roller or spray. Do not reduce for brush or roller applications. If reduction is necessary for spray, use a small amount of water. Tinting should be done with universal tinting colors. Note: Wipe up any spills promptly; these products have excellent adhesion and will stick tenaciously to most anything making removal difficult once the product dries.

How To: Refinishing Vinyl Siding

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How To: Refinishing Vinyl Siding

Vinyl siding is made from vinyl plastic and pigments. There is no coating. The pigments are distributed all though the plastic. After years of exposure to the elements, fading, chalking, and dirt pick-up diminish the appearance.

Vinyl siding is a good substrate to paint since it is relatively dimensionally stable and doesn’t crack like wood surfaces do. With care in surface preparation, selection of primer(for metal parts) and topcoat, and good application, a repaint job’s longevity can approach the life of the original siding.

Vinyl siding will warp from heat build-up. For this reason, very dark colors are not recommended. As a general rule, do not paint vinyl siding any darker than the color of the original vinyl siding color.

Surface Preparation

The surface must be clean. There are four things that usually must be eliminated before priming can occur: dirt, grease and grime, mildew and chalk. Rust may be present on metal fasteners, flashing, etc. Rust must be removed by brushing with a steel brush. A power wash will normally, but not always, remove dirt and chalk. Usually, plain water will do the job. If cleaners or bleach is used in the wash, the chemicals must be rinsed off before priming. After power washing, the surface should be rubbed with a black cloth. If there is evidence of chalk on the rag, the remaining chalk must be abraded off by scrubbing with a brush followed by a rinse. Paint will not stick to a chalky surface. A chlorine containing chemical such as household bleach will remove mildew. If bleach is used, it must be rinsed off before priming.

Priming

Priming of the vinyl siding is not necessary. Prime metal parts with Z6631 Krylon Iron Guard after cleaning and removing the rust.

Finish Coat

After the primer is thoroughly dry, apply a coat of California Aqua Borne Ceramic House Paint if a semi-gloss finish is desired. Apply a brush, roller or spray. Thin sparingly with water as needed. Do not apply under 50 degrees. Use a .017 to .021 tip for airless spray applications. Both finishes dry to a hard, impervious finish that resists dirt pickup and is non-chalking. One coat will give good protection, but two coats are recommended for the best durability. Allow the first coat to dry thoroughly before recoating. At least two hours under normal conditions is needed before recoating.

How To: Refinish Kitchen Cabinets

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How To: Refinish Kitchen Cabinets

Refinishing kitchen cabinets is a very rewarding project. With a little effort in preparing the job and the use of California Aqua Borne Ceramic Finishes, kitchen cabinets can be made to look like new.

  • Cover up counter tops and mask any areas that might be damaged by cleaning and painting.
  • Clean the cabinets thoroughly with a good household cleaner such as Fantastik or 409. Rinse off the cleaner with water. It is very important to remove all traces of oil, dirt and grease. Paint will not stick to oily surfaces. Kitchen cabinets typically build up oils and grease over the years, so it is really important to make sure all oil and grease is removed. Pay particular attention to the area around handles. It may be necessary to use a product made specifically to remove grease.
  • If the old finish is glossy, it must be sanded to remove the gloss. Use sandpaper, not steel wool. Steel wool will leave small steel fibers that may rust from the water in the finish causing brown rust spots. It is usually a good idea to sand to make the surface smooth and dull. After sanding remove the sanding dust with a rag moistened with water or use a vacuum. So not use tack rags as they may cause poor adhesion of the finish coat.
  • It is not absolutely essential to use a primer since in most cases the California Aqua Borne Ceramic Finishes will adhere well to the cabinets without a primer*. However, if the cabinet is not perfectly smooth, it may be desirable to use the 320-00 Aqua Borne Acrylic Primer/Undercoater to fill in small cracks and surface imperfections. This primer can be sanded to achieve a very smooth surface. Either with or without a primer, it is suggested that a small area be coated first and the adhesion checked after the trial area is thoroughly dry before coating the entire job.
  • Apply a coat of California Aqua Borne Ceramic Satin or Gloss finish with a brush, roller or spray equipment. Do not reduce the finish for brush or roller application. Two coats will give maximum protection. Reduce with water as needed for spray applications. Allow to dry overnight before using cabinets.
  • Clean up equipment with soap and water.
  • Step back and admire your gleaming new cainets!
  • Note: Some very old kitchen cabinets may have been coated with shellac. Aqua Borne Ceramic finishes will partially dissolve shellac-causing cracking of the film. If cabinets to be refinsished are coated with shellac, first prime the cabinets with Acryplex #4 Oil Stain Sealer. You can test to see if the cabinets have been shellacked by rubbing the cabinet with alcohol. Alcohol will dissolve shellac.

How To: Prepare Concrete Before Painting

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How To: Prepare Concrete Before Painting

Before painting a concrete floor, the floor should be tested to see what preparation is needed to assure the coating will adhere well.

Test for the presence of a curing compound

Most concrete floors had a chemical curing agent applied after the concrete set up. Many of these curing agents will prevent good adhesion of coatings. To test for a curing agent, pour a little muriatic acid on the floor. If the solution bubbles, there isn’t any curing compound left on the surface or there wasn’t one to begin with. If the acid doesn’t bubble, then there is a curing compound on the surface that must be removed before painting. Check several different areas of the floor because the curing compounds may have worn off unevenly.

Removing curing compounds

            Curing compounds must be removed with either chemical removers or mechanically by floor machines equipped with screeds or shot blasting.

Test for grease and oil

            Coatings will not adhere to grease and oil. Unfortunately, grease and oils are commonly found on concrete floors. Dark spots are an indicator that grease and oil are in the floor. Sprinkle a little water on the floor. If it beads up, grease or/and oil may be present. Note that a curing agent may also bead up water. Another test is to apply a piece of duct tape to the area in question. If the tape pulls away very easily, grease or/ and oil are present. Grease and oil must be removed before coating.

Removing grease and oil

Apply granular oil dry compound to the dark spots and areas where it is obvious that oil and grease are present. Let stand overnight. Sweep or vacuum the compound up. Apply a good commercial oil and grease remover and follow the manufacturers recommendations. Use an electric floor scrubber or a stiff bristle brush. Alternatively, use a strong TSP solution and floor scrubber or bristle brush. Rinse well and allow to dry. The floor color should be relatively uniform. If there are dark spots, put a little muriatic acid on the spots. If the acid bubbles, the floor is probably ok to coat if the acid doesn’t bubble, grease and/ or oil are still present and the floor must be degreased again. Repeat these steps until the floor is completely free of grease and oil.

Testing for adhesion of existing coatings

            Existing coatings do not necessarily have to be removed. It may be possible to coat right over them if they are in sound condition and are adhering well to the concrete. To test adhesion, score the existing coating down to the concrete with a shar knife. Make five cuts about two inches in length parallel to another about ¼” apart. Make five more cuts at 90 degrees to the first so you end up with 50 little ¼ inch squares. Apply duct tape to the area and firmly press it in place. Pull off the tape. If the coating doesn’t pull up the little squares, the coating is ok to leave in place. If a significant number of squares come up, the coating needs to be removed. It is normal to get a little dry paint on the tape where the cuts were made. This is ok.

Removing old paint

Abrasive blasting with shot, beads or sand can be used to remove old coatings. Chemical removers can also be used by following the manufacturers instructions.

Acid Etching

Acid etching assures the concrete provides a good surface for the coating to adhere. After the floor is clean and degreased, apply a 50-50 mixture of muriatic acid (20% strength) to the floor. CAUTION: MURIATIC ACID CAN CAUSE BAD BURNS. WEAR GOGGLES, PROTECTIVE CLOTHING, RUBBER GLOVES AND RUBBER BOOTS. ALWAYS ADD ACID TO WATER, NEVER ADD WATER TO ACID. Allow to remain on floor for 15 minutes. The acid will bubble up as it reacts with the concrete. Rinse with water. Rinse again with water and ammonia to neutralize the acid. Rinse a third time with plain water. After the surface is dry, it should feel like medium grit sandpaper. If the concrete is still smooth, a second application of muriatic acid is needed.

The floor is now ready for coating. Follow the paint manufacturers instructions for coating. We recommend Ultra Tred 2 part epoxy or Aqua Borne Ceramic Floor Enamel.

How to: Painting Plaster

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How to: Painting Plaster

            Plaster surfaces are very good substrates to paint because plaster has good “tooth” for the paint to adhere to, is smooth and reasonably dimensionally stable. However, new plaster will not hold paint well. New plaster contains a lot of water that must come out before paint is applied. If the water is not allowed to come out, the water may force itself through the paint causing blistering and loss of adhesion. Also, new plaster is very alkaline. This strong alkalinity can adversely affect adhesion.

It is strongly recommended that new plaster be allowed to dry thoroughly, at least 30 days before a primer is applied. We do not recommend painting plaster before 30 days drying time. Quite often, in freshly plastered rooms, the high humidity can be felt. If after 30 days the humidity in the rooms is still extraordinarily high, more drying time is required to allow the water to escape from the plaster. After the plaster is dry, apply a coat of Aqua Borne Ceramic 3200-00 blockout/ enamel Undercoat Primer. This primer lays down to a very smooth finish and has excellent adhesion. Its 100% acrylic formula resists any lingering effect of high alkalinity. Any high-quality finish coat can be applied over the primer. We recommend two finish coats of Ultra Aqua Borne Ceramic Flat, Satin, or Gloss Enamel.

Since the surface of plaster is so smooth, we recommend using a short-nap roller such as a 3/8”, certainly no longer ½”, to minimize the marks left by the nap on the wall. Spraying is an ideal application method to preserve the smooth surface of the plaster.

How To: Painting Ceramic Tile

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How To: Painting Ceramic Tile

            Old dingy ceramic tile can be rejuvenated and given a modern color by painting the tile with California Aqua Borne Ceramic products. California Aqua Borne Ceramic have excellent adhesion to tile surfaces as long as they are clean.

            The first step is to thoroughly clean the tile to remove dirt, grease, oil, soap scum, water hardness deposits and any other foreign materials that might interfere with adhesion. Was the tile surfaces with a strong detergent solution or other good household cleaner. Rinse. Use a calcium deposit remover if necessary. Rinse well. Inspect to make sure all foreign matter has been removed. Sand lightly to scuff the surface. Remove sanding dust.

Apply a coat of 320-00 Aqua Borne Blockout/Undercoater White. Best results are achieved by using the primer first. If the tile has a very high gloss, light scuff sanding before the undercoater is applied will improve adhesion. The undercoater may be sanded to achieve a very smooth finish. Let dry for four hours   and apply a coat of California Aqua Borne Ceramic Gloss, Satin, or Flat finishes. Apply a second coat. The products can be applied by brush, roller or spray. Do not reduce for brush or spray applications. If reduction is necessary for spray, use a small amount of water. Tinting should be done with universal tinting colors.